How many Problems for Overweight Children?

Definition of Overweight

When people eat more calories than they burn, their body stores more calories than fat.

A few extra pounds of body fat do not pose a health risk to most people. But when people burn a pattern of more calories than they burn, more and fatter is accumulating in their bodies.

Eventually, the body reaches a point where the amount of body fat can have a negative impact on a person’s health. Physicians use the terms “overweight” or “obese” to describe when a person is at increased risk of developing weight-related health problems.

As you have probably already heard, there are more people overweight today than ever before. Experts call this an “epidemic of obesity”. This health problem affects both youth and adults: one-third of all children aged 2 to 19 are overweight or obese. Gradually, increasing the amount of overweight children because of that they are facing high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetics.

Obesity in Children

Today, nearly one in four children and adolescents in developed countries are overweight or obese. These extra pounds expose children to serious health problems such as diabetes, heart disease, and asthma. Obesity in children also has emotional costs. Obese children often have difficulty following other children and participating in sports and activities. Other children may disturb and exclude them, resulting in low self-esteem, negative body image and even depression.

But you can do a lot to help your children. Early diagnosis of weight problems and obesity in children can reduce the risk of developing serious diseases as they age. By involving the whole family, you can break the cycle of weight problems and obesity, increase the physical and mental health of your children and help them establish a healthy relationship with foods that will last a lifetime. The parents have to follow how to reduce children’s overweight. Parents can take weight lose protein shakes by doctor advice. No matter how heavy their children are, they know they love and all they want to do is help them stay healthy and happy.

Is your Child Overweight?

Children grow at different speeds at different times, so it’s not always easy to know if a child is overweight. Body Mass Index (BMI) uses height and weight to measure a child’s body fat. However, although BMI is usually a good indicator, it is not a perfect measure of body fat and may even be misleading when children experience periods of rapid growth.

If your child has a high BMI for age measurement, your doctor may make additional judgments and tests to determine if excess fat is a problem.

Causes of Weight Problems and Obesity in Children

Understanding how children are overweight is an important step in breaking the cycle. Most cases of childhood obesity are caused by too much food and little exercise. Enough healthy fruits need to support healthy growth and development. But if they take extra calories that they don’t have need, it results in weight gain.

Causes of weight problems in children can include:

  • Busy families who cook for the homeless and eat more.
  • Easy access to fast food and cheap, high-calorie junk food.
  • Larger portions of food, both in restaurants and at home.
  • Children consume large amounts of sugar in sugary drinks and hide in a variety of foods.
  • Children spend less time outdoors and have more time to watch TV, play video games and sit in front of their computers.
  • Many schools eliminate or reduce their physical education programs.

Causes of Weight Problems and Obesity in Children

Understanding how children are overweight is an important step in breaking the cycle. Most cases of childhood obesity are caused by too much food and little exercise. Children need enough food to support healthy growth and development. But if they consume more calories than they burn during the day, it results in weight gain.

Causes of weight problems in children can include:

  • Busy families who cook for the homeless and eat more.
  • Easy access to fast food and cheap, high-calorie junk food.
  • Larger portions of food, both in restaurants and at home.
  • Children consume large amounts of sugar in sugary drinks and hide in a variety of foods.
  • Children spend less time outdoors and have more time to watch TV, play video games and sit in front of their computers.
  • Many schools eliminate or reduce their physical education programs.

To Fight Weight Problems, Involve the Whole Family

Healthy habits start at home. The best way to combat or prevent childhood obesity and weight problems is to get the whole family on a healthier path. Better eating habits and more active activities benefit everyone, regardless of weight.

It can also have a significant impact on the health of your children by examining the details of their lives. Spending time with your kids – talking about their day, playing, reading, cooking – can give them the self-esteem they need to make positive changes.

Leading by Example

If your children see that you are eating your vegetables, are active and are limiting your listening time, they are likely to do the same.

What you eat: Talk to your child about the healthy diet you eat while you eat it. You could say, “I eat broccoli with garlic sauce.” Want a bite?

When cooking: cook healthy in front of your children. Better yet, give them age-appropriate work in the kitchen. Tell them what you are doing and why it is good for your body.

How you move: movement anyway, every day. Be authentic, do the things you love. Tell your children what you are doing and invite them to join you.

Your free time: Avoid watching TV or spending too much time on the computer. Children do not turn on screens often when they are off, and you do something they can handle.

Real life Strategies

  • Realize that you have more control than you think. You can turn off the TV, computer, or video game. You can choose to get off the bus earlier than usual and walk the rest of the way, especially if you are traveling with your children. You can give your family more veggies for dinner.
  • Think about the immediate benefits. When reducing the risk of future heart disease appears abstract, focus on the good things that can happen at that time. You will not feel uncomfortable if you have a smaller portion or miss the dessert. A hike with your teenager could lead to a wonderful conversation that none of you was waiting for. Dancing or playing with your kids is fun and can give you a good workout.
  • Make small, simple changes over time. Tell family members that they walk together every day will probably give you many twists and turns. It is easier and more attractive to start with new approaches to nutrition and exercise that the whole family really wants to try. For example, after dinner, you spend a few nights a week instead of turning on the TV.

About the author: Frederick

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